Pilates for Men

While women tend to dominate Pilates classes, Pilates holds plenty of benefits for men who rise to the challenge—yes, it’s hard. Whether you’re a power lifter or prepping for your first marathon, a Pilates class can help fine-tune your performance. How? Exercises are made up of subtle, concentrated movements that can help you do the following:

– Develop often neglected muscle groups. Some of your muscles, like those that dominate your daily movements, are stronger than others, and a big part of Pilates is focusing on those muscles that don’t typically get a lot of attention. Pilates is similar to MAT training in that you consciously move in certain ways to build muscles that you don’t hit while lifting.

– Improve flexibility. In general, the more muscle mass you have, the less flexible you are. But Pilates’ focus on stretching helps prevent injuries and muscle strains, and increases range of motion.

– Build core strength. Every Pilates exercise focuses on using your core to power movement in your limbs. Pilates also hits your transverse abdominal, the base abs muscle under your six-pack.

– Live more consciously. Pilates forces you to pay attention—you’ve got to focus on your breath while working through each movement and concentrating on proper form.

Pilates and TRX

 

Pilates exercise is great for building kinesthetic awareness and teaching basic movement patterns.

Using TRX  with a “Pilates-frame of reference,” creates a delicious, dynamic, functional training workout that is exhilarating and incomparable.

Cross-training with the TRX Suspension equipment and Pilates-based movements, can lead to better muscular balance and joint stability.  This is due to the fact that Pilates with the use of TRX emphasizes the body’s natural ability to move in three anatomical planes of motion.

Quite a few people erroneously equate strength training with gyms, weights and bodybuilding. Challenge them with a Pilates sequence using the TRX and eyes will be opened to a new world of bodywork. Pilates and Pilates-based movements make a great choice for creating adaptive training workouts that build strength with length and flexibility.